How to run a node?

A technical guide on how to run you own validator.

Run Local Node

This guide will walk you trough running your own validator node using a docker image. Please make sure you have access to a continuously running machine, if you like to participate as a network validator.

Pre-Requisites

A complete Docker environment is needed to be installed on your system, as well as Docker-Compose

Make sure that your user is added to the docker user-group on Unix systems, if you can't access root permissions to run containers.

Hardware

Note: specified for Microsoft Azure, but similar on other providers as well

Bootnode, Node or Explorer Node

  • OS - Linux (ubuntu 18.04)

  • Size - Standard B2ms (2 vcpus, 8 GiB memory)

  • Disk - 30 GiB Premium SSD

  • Networking

| Priority | Description | Port | Protocol | Source | Destination | Action |
|---------- |-------------------------------- |------- |---------- |------------------------- |---------------- |-------- |
| 1000 | ssh | 22 | TCP | ip list comma-separated | Any | Allow |
| 1001 | p2p | 30303 | TCP | Any | Any | Allow |
| 1002 | p2p udp | 30303 | UDP | Any | Any | Allow |
| 1003 | rpc | 8545 | TCP | Any | Any | Allow |
| 1004 | https | 443 | TCP | Any | Any | Allow |
| 1005 | http | 80 | TCP | Any | Any | Allow |
| 65000 | AllowVnetInBound | Any | Any | VirtualNetwork | VirtualNetwork | Allow |
| 65001 | AllowAzureLoadBalancerInBound | Any | Any | AzureLoadBalancer | Any | Allow |
| 65500 | DenyAllInBound | Any | Any | Any | Any | Deny |

Validator

  • OS - Linux (ubuntu 18.04)

  • Size - Standard D2s v3 (2 vcpus, 8 GiB memory)

  • Disk - 30 GiB Premium SSD

  • Networking

| Priority | Description | Port | Protocol | Source | Destination | Action |
|---------- |-------------------------------- |------- |---------- |------------------------- |---------------- |-------- |
| 1000 | ssh | 22 | TCP | ip list comma-separated | Any | Allow |
| 1001 | p2p | 30303 | TCP | Any | Any | Allow |
| 1002 | p2p udp | 30303 | UDP | Any | Any | Allow |

Using Quickstart

To make starting a node for the FuseNetwork as quick as possible, the quickstart script can be used.

  1. Download the script.

  2. Download one of the example .env files located at the examples folder.

  3. Modify the .env file according to the role/type of node you're running.

  4. Start the script.

The script will make sure you have everything that is necessary, create a new account for you (if needed) and start the relevant containers (based on the role/type of node) with all requested arguments.

The script can be called multiple times without problems, so it checks what is already there and will at least update all service processes.

$ wget -O quickstart.sh https://raw.githubusercontent.com/fuseio/fuse-network/master/scripts/quickstart.sh
$ chmod 777 quickstart.sh
$ wget -O .env https://raw.githubusercontent.com/fuseio/fuse-network/master/scripts/examples/.env.<ROLE>.example
$ ./quickstart.sh

Follow the instructions emitted by the script.

Using Docker

The following instructions explain how to start a local node with the Docker image.

In fact it uses a pre-configured Parity Ethereum client, combined with a set-up wrapper, to make connecting as easy as possible.

The image is prepared to be used as node, validator or explorer node.

Usage

To run the parity client for the FuseNetwork you first have to pull the image from DockerHub.

It does not matter in which directory your are working this step, cause it will be added to Docker's very own database.

Afterwards calling the help should give a first basic overview how to use.

$ docker pull fusenet/node
$ docker run fusenet/node --help
# NAME
# Parity Wrapper
#
# SYNOPSIS
# parity_wrapper.sh [-r] [role] [-a] [address] [-p] [arguments]
#
# DESCRIPTION
# A wrapper for the actual Parity client to make the Docker image easy usable by preparing the Parity client for
# a set of predefined list of roles the client can take without have to write lines of arguments on run Docker.
#
# OPTIONS
# -r [--role] Role the Parity client should use.
# Depending on the chosen role Parity gets prepared for that role.
# Selecting a specific role can require further arguments.
# Checkout ROLES for further information.
#
# -a [--address] The Ethereum address that parity should use.
# Depending on the chosen role, the address gets inserted at the right place of the configuration, so Parity is aware of it.
# Gets ignored if not necessary for the chosen role.
#
# -p [--parity-args] Additional arguments that should be forwarded to the Parity client.
# Make sure this is the last argument, cause everything after is forwarded to Parity.
#
# ROLES
# The list of available roles is:
#
# bootnode
# - No mining.
# - RPC ports open.
# - Does not require the address argument.
# - Does not need the password file and the key-set. (see FILES)
# node
# - No mining.
# - RPC ports open.
# - Does not require the address argument.
# - Does not need the password file and the key-set. (see FILES)
#
# validator
# - Connect as authority to the network for validating blocks.
# - Miner.
# - RPC ports open.
# - Requires the address argument.
# - Needs the password file and the key-set. (see FILES)
#
# explorer
# - No mining.
# - RPC ports open.
# - Does not require the address argument.
# - Does not need the password file and the key-set. (see FILES)
# - Some of Parity's settings are configured specifically for the use of blockscout explorer.
#
# FILES
# The configuration folder for Parity takes place at /home/parity/.local/share/io.parity.ethereum.
# Alternately the shorthand symbolic link at /config can be used.
# Parity's database is at /home/parity/.local/share/io.parity.ethereum/chains or available trough /data as well.
# To provide custom files in addition bind a volume through Docker to the sub-folder called 'custom'.
# The password file is expected to be placed in the custom configuration folder names 'pass.pwd'.
# The key-set is expected to to be placed in the custom configuration folder under 'keys/FuseNetwork/'
# Besides from using the pre-defined locations, it is possible to define them manually thought the parity arguments. Checkout their documentation to do so.

Examples

Besides the original help, the following sections provide some example instructions how to get started for the different roles.

Bootnode

## Start parity container with all necessary arguments.
$ docker run \
--detach \
--name fusenet \
--volume $(pwd)/fusenet/database:/data \
--volume $(pwd)/fusenet/config:/config/custom \
-p 30303:30300/tcp \
-p 30303:30300/udp \
-p 8545:8545 \
-p 8546:8546 \
--restart=on-failure \
fusenet/node \
--role node \
--parity-args --no-warp --node-key $NODE_KEY --bootnodes=$BOOTNODES

Node

## Start parity container with all necessary arguments.
$ docker run \
--detach \
--name fusenet \
--volume $(pwd)/fusenet/database:/data \
--volume $(pwd)/fusenet/config:/config/custom \
-p 30303:30300/tcp \
-p 30303:30300/udp \
-p 8545:8545 \
-p 8546:8546 \
--restart=on-failure \
fusenet/node \
--role node \
--parity-args --no-warp --node-key $NODE_KEY

Validator

The validator should be connected with an account to sign transactions and interact with the blockchain, the help output states that the accounts key-pair, address and the related password is necessary to provide.

To make all files accessible to the Docker container needs a binded volume.

Therefore create a new folder to do so.

The following instructions expect the folder config inside the current working directory. Adjust them if you prefer a different location.

Inside a directory for the keys with another sub-directory for the FuseNetwork chain is used by Parity.

Your key-file has to be placed there.

Afterwards the key's password has to be stored into a file directly inside the config folder.

To make use of the default configurations without adjustment, the file has to be called pass.pwd.

If you have no account already or want to create a new one for this purpose checkout this section.

Using so the previous paragraph as well as the first 2-3 instructions can be ignored.

Anyways the password used there has to be stored as shown below.

Finally the client has to be started with the volume bound, the correct role and the address to use.

$ mkdir -p ./config/keys/FuseNetwork
$ cp /path/to/my/key ./config/keys/FuseNetwork/
$ echo "mysupersecretpassphrase" > ./config/pass.pwd
$ mkdir ./database
## Start parity container with all necessary arguments.
$ docker run \
--detach \
--name fusenet \
--volume $(pwd)/fusenet/database:/data \
--volume $(pwd)/fusenet/config:/config/custom \
-p 30303:30300/tcp \
-p 30303:30300/udp \
-p 8545:8545 \
--restart=on-failure \
fusenet/node \
--role validator \
--address $address

As part of validator's responsibilities in the network, two more containers need to be started along side the Parity node.

One is the validator-app

## Start validator-app container with all necessary arguments.
$ docker run \
--detach \
--name fuseapp \
--volume $(pwd)/fusenet/config:/config/custom \
--restart=on-failure \
fusenet/validator-app

Second one is the bridge-oracle

$ wget -O docker-compose.yml https://raw.githubusercontent.com/fuseio/bridge-oracle/master/docker-compose.keystore.yml
## Start oracle container with all necessary arguments.
$ docker-compose up \
--build \
-d
;;

Create New Account

If you have no existing account or a new one should be created anyway, Parity could be used to do so.

Please consider other options like MetaMask or any other (online) wallet tool.

In relation to the instructions for the validator role, we use the folder called config to bind as Docker volume to Parity.

Afterwards the key will be placed there and the first steps of these instructions can be skipped.

$ mkdir ./config
$ docker run -ti -v $(pwd)/config/:/config/custom fusenet/node --parity-args account new

Parity will ask for a password, that should be stored by you into ./config/pass.pwd afterwards.

The address corresponding to the generated private key gets printed out on the CLI at the last line starting with 0x.

Please copy it for the later use. It will be needed for the --address argument where it will be added in plain text.

Explorer node

If you want to run a node to be used by the blockscout explorer run the following command:

## Start parity container with all necessary arguments.
$ docker run \
--detach \
--name fusenet \
--volume $(pwd)/fusenet/database:/data \
--volume $(pwd)/fusenet/config:/config/custom \
-p 30303:30300/tcp \
-p 30303:30300/udp \
-p 8545:8545 \
-p 8546:8546 \
--restart=on-failure \
fusenet/node \
--role explorer \
--parity-args --node-key $NODE_KEY

Note

All roles should also run a Ethereum Network Intelligence API app as well, in order to connect themselves as part of the network and be viewed by the health service

$ docker run \
--detach \
--name fusenetstat \
--net=container:fusenet \
--restart=on-failure \
fusenet/netstat \
--instance-name $INSTANCE_NAME